"With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations."
June 14, 2017 - 12 p.m. - Nance: The First Slave Freed by Abraham Lincoln - BROWN BAG LUNCH AND TALK BY CARL ADAMS. National Capitol Historical Society, Ketchum Hall, Veterans of Foreign Wars Building, 200 Maryland Avenue NE. No charge.
June 24, 2017 - TOUR OF ANTIETAM BATTLEFIELD
August 26, 2017 - Open Discussion: The Secession Crisis 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. - New York Presbyterian Church
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Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in. That every man may receive at least, a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears to be an object of vital importance, even on this account alone, to say nothing of the advantages and satisfaction to be derived from all being able to read the scriptures and other works, both of a religious and moral nature, for themselves. For my part, I desire to see the time when education, and by its means, morality, sobriety, enterprise and industry, shall become much more general than at present, and should be gratified to have it in my power to contribute something to the advancement of any measure which might have a tendency to accelerate the happy period.
--March 9, 1832 - First Political Announcement

Professor Daniel Crofts

Abraham Lincoln Readings Seminar

Daniel W. Crofts has written five books about the North-South sectional crisis that led to the Civil War. Among them are Reluctant Confederates: Upper South Unionists in the Secession Crisis (University of North Carolina Press, 1989), which looked at three key Upper South states—Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee—where most white people opposed secession but ended up fighting on the southern side.

His the newest book, Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union (University of North Carolina Press, 2016), will be the focus of his remarks tonight.

Dan made over a dozen contributions between 2011 and 2014 to the New York Times blog “Disunion,” an on-line collection of essays marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

He holds a doctorate from Yale University (1968) and taught for many years at The College of New Jersey, where he chaired the History Department for nine years.