"With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations."
October 16, 2018 - John Muller: John Muller – Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass
October 20, 2018 - Book Discussion Group
November 10, 2018 - Book Discussion Group
December 14, 2018 - Lincoln Group lunch meeting at Maggiano's
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Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in. That every man may receive at least, a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears to be an object of vital importance, even on this account alone, to say nothing of the advantages and satisfaction to be derived from all being able to read the scriptures and other works, both of a religious and moral nature, for themselves. For my part, I desire to see the time when education, and by its means, morality, sobriety, enterprise and industry, shall become much more general than at present, and should be gratified to have it in my power to contribute something to the advancement of any measure which might have a tendency to accelerate the happy period.
--March 9, 1832 - First Political Announcement

History 550 — The Life and Times of Abraham Lincoln

MISSION AND PROGRAM GOALS: The mission of the Department of History at Winthrop University is to promote in students historical skills and knowledge. Our students develop the habit of critical thinking and the capacity for “historical thinking.” Historical thinking means developing a firm grasp of the multiplicity and intricacy of historical causes and effects, an understanding of how knowledge is a human construct, an ability to think from a global perspective, and an appreciation for the variety and approaches of historical interpretation. Students also advance their fluency in written and oral expression and argumentation.

Students develop the skills to conduct independent research.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: This course relates to

  • Goal One - (To communicate clearly and effectively in Standard English) by requiring students to articulate their ideas both in writing and speech.
  • Goals Two - (To use critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and a variety of research methods) and
  • Goal Three - (To recognize and appreciate human diversity -- - both past and present – as well as the diversity of ideas, institutions, philosophies, moral codes, and ethical principles) are covered in the student’s requirement of critical analysis and studying the multi-cultural tapestry that comprises American history.
  • Goal Four - (To examine values, attitudes, beliefs, and habits which define the nature and quality of life) is accomplished by imparting to the students an appreciation of their history and heritage.

ATTENDANCE: New material will be presented at each lecture and you will be responsible for this material on exams. The Winthrop attendance policy will be used for this course. I will take attendance at each class primarily for the purpose of learning names but attendance records will factor in the assigning of final grades. Ultimately, of course, the decision to come to class is yours. But if you choose to come to class you are expected to arrive on time and remain for the entire class period.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: There will be three take home exams/papers each counting approximately one-third of the final grade. You will be allowed to use your notes, books, and encouraged to use the library. Each will be 5-7 typed pages in length, citing the sources you use. Each will cover only their respective sections of the course as well as the appropriate readings. Before the exam you will be given prospective questions as prompts from which your paper will be written. Final grades for this course will not be assigned solely on the basis of a mathematical formula. I do not use the plus/minus grade policy. Elements such as improvement, interest, and attendance, will be taken into consideration when final grades are assigned and will be particularly helpful in instances when grades are “borderline.” AND YOU MUST DO THE ASSIGNED READINGS.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: Graduate students will be required, in addition to the requirements of the course, to complete a ten-fifteen page research paper on a mutually agreeable topic.

ATTENDANCE: New material will be presented at each lecture and you will be responsible for this material on exams. The Winthrop attendance policy will be used for this course. I will take attendance at each class primarily for the purpose of learning names but attendance records will factor in the assigning of final grades. Ultimately, of course, the decision to come to class is yours. But if you choose to come to class you are expected to arrive on time and remain for the entire class period.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: There will be three take home exams/papers each counting approximately one-third of the final grade. You will be allowed to use your notes, books, and encouraged to use the library. Each will be 5-7 typed pages in length, citing the sources you use. Each will cover only their respective sections of the course as well as the appropriate readings. Before the exam you will be given prospective questions as prompts from which your paper will be written. Final grades for this course will not be assigned solely on the basis of a mathematical formula. I do not use the plus/minus grade policy. Elements such as improvement, interest, and attendance, will be taken into consideration when final grades are assigned and will be particularly helpful in instances when grades are “borderline.” AND YOU MUST DO THE ASSIGNED READINGS.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: Graduate students will be required, in addition to the requirements of the course, to complete a ten-fifteen page research paper on a mutually agreeable topic.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

(1) Students will be able to communicate effectively core themes, ideas, and subject matter, in both written and oral form.

(2) Students will demonstrate an ability to comprehend and explain major issues in historiography.

(3) Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research, applying basic research methods in history such as using search tools, finding primary and secondary sources, and assessing critically those sources.

(4) Students will be able to discuss critically important developments of global history, especially issues and events significant to areas outside the United States.

(5) Students will be able to discuss critically significant issues and themes of United States history.

COURSE GOALS: This course is intended to teach the students that history is a dynamic discipline more than the sum total of names and dates. Students will read, write, and critically analyze while grasping the concepts of the study of history and it application to their present lives through lectures, assigned readings, writing assignments, and exams. Students will be asked to apply what they have learned in a comprehensive sense and relate the significance and majesty to history as it applies to events, personalities, policies, and programs of the past.

THE COURSE: This course focuses on the life of Abraham Lincoln as a way to study the Civil War era in the United States. As such, this course is both a biographical and topical study in its approach. It will be organized chronologically as much as possible, following the story of Lincoln’s life, though particular topics will receive attention at appropriate places within the broadly biographical structure. Readings will be drawn from both the speeches and writings of Lincoln himself and from the secondary sources assigned as required readings.

Hopefully, in the course of this semester, we will gain a deeper knowledge of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era and a better understanding of the history of slavery, emancipation, and race relations in nineteenth century America. We will also reflect on the ability of an individual to influence, or fail to influence, the historical events in the age in which he lived. In this regard, we will study biography as a genre of history and historiography to evaluate differing scholarly interpretations about Lincoln and the Civil War.

REQUIRED READINGS:

William E. Gienapp, Abraham Lincoln and Civil War America: A Biography

Brian R. Dirck, Lincoln and the Constitution

Jason H. Silverman, Lincoln and the Immigrant

Kenneth J. Winkle, Abraham and Mary Lincoln

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

Richard Striner, Lincoln and Race

Michael Burlingame, Lincoln and the Civil War

OTHER RESOURCES:

The following books may be of help throughout the semester if you need more information about Lincoln or need to consult a significant source as you prepare and study for tests.

Douglas L. Wilson, Honor’s Voice: The Transformation of Abraham Lincoln

Mark E. Neely, Jr., The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties

David Herbert Donald, Lincoln

Allen C. Guelzo,

  • Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President,
  • Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America
  • Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America

Richard J. Carwardine, Lincoln

Don E. Fehrenbacher, Prelude to Greatness: Lincoln in the 1850s

Robert W. Johannsen, Lincoln, the South, and Slavery: The Political Dimension

William C. Harris, With Charity For All: Lincoln and the Restoration of the Union

LaWanda Cox, Lincoln and Black Freedom: A Study in Presidential Leadership

Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln

Richard Striner, Father Abraham: Lincoln’s Relentless Struggle to End Slavery

William Marvel, Mr. Lincoln Goes to War

John C. Waugh,

  • Reelecting Lincoln: The Battle for the 1864 Presidency
  • Lincoln and McClellan: The Troubled Partnership Between a President and His General

Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

Harold Holzer

  • Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President
  • Lincoln President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and The Great Secession Winter
  • Lincoln and the Power of the Press

Michael Burlingame, Abraham Lincoln, 2 vols

Ronald White, Lincoln

Brian McGinty, Lincoln and the Court

Thomas Krannawitter, Vindicating Lincoln: Defending the Politics of Our Greatest President

REFERENCE WORKS:

Roy P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, 9 vols.

Earl Schenck Miers, ed., Lincoln Day By Day: A Chronology, 1809-1865, 3 vols.

Merrill D. Peterson, Lincoln In American Memory

Mark E. Neely, Jr., The Abraham Lincoln Encyclopedia

Paul Finkelman and Martin Herschock, The Political Lincoln: An Encyclopedia

ONLINE SOURCES:

http://www.abrahamlincolnassoc.com/index.htm This is the website of the Abraham Lincoln Association. On it, you can do keyword searches in the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. The “Lincoln Log” link gives you a day-by-day chronology of Lincoln’s life, with links to pertinent documents. There is also an up-to- date “Bibliography” of books, articles, and reviews. The Abraham Lincoln Association publishes its own scholarly journal with articles on Lincoln and his times. It is available electronically at http://jala.press.uiuc.edu/ which is a separate website sponsored by the University of Illinois Press.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/malhome.html This is the website for the Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress, which is part of the American Memory website. Here you can do keyword searches or browse the collection of the Abraham Lincoln Papers (which is not the same as the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln). This website also has a ‘Selected Bibliography” which seems to go up to 1998, and a list of “Related

Resources” accordingly links to many recommended websites on Lincoln and the Civil War.

http://www.gettysburg.edu/academics/cwi This is the website for the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College. It has links to “Recommended Literature” and to "Related Links” which provides links to many recommended websites on Lincoln, the Civil War, and Gettysburg.

http://www.emergingedtech.com/2015/02/resources-for- abraham-lincoln- lessons/

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Please read the following points and commit them to memory!

1. PUT YOUR CELLPHONE AWAY IMMEDIATELY UPON

ENTERING CLASS

2. Familiarize yourself with the definition of “plagiarism” so you will never be tempted to, or accused of, committing it. This includes copying practice answers from your friends. Studying together or in groups is fine and encouraged. But, remember that in the end your work must be your own and it must be done in class. Cheating will NOT be tolerated.

3. I DO NOT GIVE MAKE-UP EXAMS. Please do NOT ask for one.

4. Get to class ON TIME. It is disrespectful to me and to your fellow students to do otherwise.

5. Please do not use tape recorders during the lectures. Note taking is part of the learning process and I will build into my lectures opportunities for you to catch-up. Anytime you have a question, you need only raise your hand and ask.

6. Anytime you need my assistance I am happy to help. My office hours, phone number, and email are listed at the top of this syllabus. Feel free to contact me whenever I can be of help.

7. Please rely on all of the recommended readings and websites if you can’t find enough information in the texts or lectures as you prepare for the tests.

I want use to use additional sources as you study to achieve comprehensiveness in your answers. My response to any question that begins with “I can’t find enough material…” will always be “GO TO THE LIBRARY!!”

8. Questions you should NEVER ask me:

a. “How many classes have I, or can I, miss?”

b. “I came in late. Did you get me?”

c. “Can we go outside?”

d. “Do we have to know this, or is this going to be on the test?”

e. “What do we need to know for the exam, or when is the exam?”

f. “Have you graded the papers yet?”

g. “When can I take the make-up exam?”

SEMESTER SCHEDULE, LECTURE TOPICS, AND ASSIGNED READINGS:

Jan 11 Introduction

Jan 13, 20 Young Mr. Lincoln

Jan 25, 27 Lincoln’s Rise in Whig Politics

Feb 1, 3 Lincoln, The Law, and Politics

Feb 8, 10 The Mind of Abraham Lincoln

Feb 15, 17 Lincoln and Slavery

Feb 22 FIRST EXAM/PAPER DUE

REQUIRED READING FOR THIS EXAM: Gienapp, Abraham Lincoln,

chapters 1-4; Winkle, Abraham and Mary Lincoln, chapters 1-2; Dirck,

Constitution, chapters 1-3; Silverman, Immigrant, chapters 1-2.

Feb 24, 29 The Lincoln Douglas Debates

Mar 2, 7 Lincoln Seeks the Presidency

Mar 9, 21 Learning To Be President

Mar 23, 28 Changing the War’s Purpose

Mar 30 SECOND EXAM/PAPER DUE

REQUIRED READING FOR THIS EXAM: Gienapp, Abraham Lincoln, chapters 5-6; Winkle, Abraham and Mary Lincoln, chapter 3; Dirck, Constitution, chapters 4-6; Silverman, Immigrant, chapters 3-4.

Apr 4, 6, 11 Agony, Anguish, and Victory

Apr 13, 18 Lincoln As a Symbol of the Union

Apr 20, 25 Reelection and Martyrdom

April 25 THIRD EXAM/PAPER DUE

REQUIRED READING FOR THIS EXAM: Gienapp, Abraham Lincoln, chapters 7-8; Winkle, Abraham and Mary Lincoln, chapter 4-conclusion; Dirck, Constitution, chapter 7-Epilogue; Silverman, Immigrant, chapter 5.